#Reinvent Yourself At Work Like the #TryGuys

the try guys

The @TryGuys are four #millenials who have created a media frenzy out of simply trying new things. These millennials are creators of a comedy documentary series that shows them getting outside of their comfort zone. They try just about anything, from watching baby twins for a day to dog sledding in Alaska.  In the process, they have gained over 17 million subscribers on YouTube [https://bit.ly/2EQCUXA]. Also, throw in a blog [#tryguys], a podcast [https://bit.ly/2F6vC29] and even a self-help book [https://amzn.to/39fpiDh].

Why are the Try Guys so popular? The Try Guys highlight the fact that they are not the “Success Guys” for a reason. They do not master any of the tasks they take on, but that is not the point. Try Guy Keith Habersberger says:

“By going in and simply trying and failing or doing OK, being open to a new experience and broadening your horizons just makes you a better person. We have seen it. We have become smarter, more emotional sensitive people as we have grown and tried the 200 things we’ve tried.” [https://bit.ly/2Qm4a5C]

So how can we model the Try Guys and jump into new things in our organizations? Here are three ideas:

  1. Try New Approaches To Solve Problems

We tend to come at challenges with the same methods that we have relied of for years. Presented with the same problem, I have observed the following

  • Leadership development professionals suggest coaching.
  • Process gurus dive into Lean Six Sigma.
  • Culture consultants look to the behavioral soft stuff.
  • The list goes on…

While this may not be surprising, embracing new approaches can be a challenge. Look to a methodology that you have never applied and try it!

  1. Try Working In New Areas

We tend to become experts within specific businesses and departments. Some of us are connoisseurs in health care or retail. Others of us are wizards in Information Technology or Sales Departments.

Try working with a business or department that is completely new to you. Over the past few years I have applied my expertise to new segments like agribusiness. I have supported new departments such as Health and Safety.

The new areas I have jumped into have provided me with innovative insights and creative outcomes that I could have never imagined. Not to mention how much working with new people, products and technology has been a much needed “shot in the arm” for my practice.

  1. Try Getting Out of the Office

We tend to burn through a great deal of office time coming up with big thoughts. There is an academic bent to our work as we think through organizational challenges and solutions. However, if we spend too much time holed up in our offices we lose touch with what is really happening in our organizations.

Going to our workplace job sites can open our eyes to the most needed and practical organizational solutions. For example, the Health and Safety department I began working with led me to the shop floor at a number of plants.  As a result, I saw some fundamental aspects of our business. Why? Because I experienced these things first hand!

Perhaps the biggest lesson from the Try Guys that we can apply to our organizations is basic and yet powerful. The Try Guys would tell you to simply jump in and try these new approaches!

Note: This blog does not reflect the views of my employer.

A Creative Method For Developing Innovative Solutions: Magic Tool Box

toolbox

It can be helpful to use analogies to inspire new ideas.  I have leveraged a brainstorming tool for years called the Magic Tool Box.  In this exercise one uses a box full of tools as a metaphor for solving the problem at hand.  The objective is to spur new thinking.

I leveraged this brainstorming exercise with a group of journalists who were stationed at locations around the world.  They explored using a Swiss Army knife that was magical and could capture interview content, as well as still images and video.  It spurred the journalists to come up with approaches whereby they would capture more than just print copy as a result of their interviews.  This was before the iPhone was used to capture photos and video.

I want to make it perfectly clear that I am not saying that I am Al Gore and claiming that I invented the Internet!  I am simply pointing out that this exercise allowed the journalists to imagine doing innovative work via tools that were not even invented at the time.  Generating this kind of out of the box thinking is the greatest value of this exercise.

Below are the steps to facilitate this exercise:

  • The facilitator provides a focus statement or problem related to the area being brainstormed.
    • The problem statement is related to the area being brainstormed. For example, our challenge may be that due to a new technology system our team members are drifting apart and not collaborating.
    • The magic tools in the tool box can be items such as: Magic drill, saw, hammer, duct tape, screw driver, tape measure, glue, etc.
  • Think of uses for a wide variety of “magic tools”
    • This is where you ask the group to use their imagination. For example, ask yourself: If we had a magic hammer, what would we use it to do?
    • Come up with ways we can use the magic tool to resolve the problem that has been articulated.
    • For example, one could leverage the magic tool box to address the problem of a team being stuck in silos and not working well together. One could use duct tape to wrap it around all the team members in order to bring everyone together again.
  • Explore the results for inspiration
    • We have fantasy solutions from step two that would not work in the real world. However, these make believe ideas may lead to insights that are practical.
    • Look at the responses and explore what kind of feelings and images are arising. Look for actions and goals that make sense and could be applied in the real world.
    • For example, while it is not practical to use duct tape to wrangle everyone into a more cohesive group, an initiative or event to bring people together may be a practical solution.

This exercise can clearly help our organizations think in new ways.  Spurring this kind of creative thinking is a true contribution that we can bring to the table.

Adapted from Alexander Hiam, Manager’s Pocket Guide to Creativity, 1998

light bulb