Process Mapping – The Key is to Establish Principles

process blog pic 0519

Anyone who has participated in process mapping sessions will tell you how painful these events can be.  It is not uncommon to sequester folks for hundreds of hours and ask them to conduct intense discussions in order to capture the processes for carrying out work.  The author John Green said “The marks humans leave are too often scars.”  And scarring is exactly what many of us who have lived through process mapping sessions have plenty of!

However, does this activity need to be this painful?  Absolutely not!  And the key to making this a more effective and efficient process is to put a few core principles in place.  These rules help guide your mappers, stay on track and complete their work in an efficient manner:

·         Map the designated process only: It is easy to fall into scope creep and begin to discuss other processes which are of concern.  Once the team starts deliberating about procedures that are out of scope it is important for the facilitator to bring the group back to the task at hand.

·         Map current state only: It is also easy to start talking about what the future state process could look like.  Designing future state processes is the next step.  This is a non-value add activity at this point.  In fact, current state should provide a stake in the ground and by letting future state process ideas creep in only creates confusion.  If we don’t agree how the work gets done today, it is impossible for us to figure out how it needs to change in the future. 

·         Keep the process moving: It is common for teams to get bogged down.  This can happen as these teams talk through in detail how the process is carried out.  Establish time frames for how long it will take to map each process and help the team stick to that time frame.

The key to making sure these principles are followed is of course strong facilitation.  The facilitator is tasked with designing and running an effective session.  The facilitator is guiding the group where it needs to go via ensuring that processes are followed, asking probing questions and helping sum up the work being accomplished and capture it visually. 

Perhaps most important, the facilitator is cuts off conversation once the point has been made.  Asking someone to stop talking is key.  What could be considered rude behavior at a dinner party, is the most important role the facilitator plays during process mapping!

This blog does not reflect the view of my employer.

Published by Kevin Anderson, Dr. Organizational Design (OD)

Kevin Anderson is a leading expert in organizational design and performance, leadership, large scale change projects, business process engineering and talent and culture initiatives. Kevin has over twenty five years of experience in designing and delivering high impact, global organizational solutions. He is a Senior Organizational Development Consultant at Cargill where he leads efforts around team effectiveness, organizational design, culture and change management. Kevin diagnoses, proposes and delivers solutions in the Talent Performance domain. He has also created and rolled out Leadership Development and Organizational Development for the City of Minneapolis. Before that Kevin successfully worked with Accelare consulting health care, retail and university clients to create actionable strategic plans. In addition, he has served as an organizational development leader at Thomson Reuters working with legal, financial and scientific products. Kevin has a Doctorate in Organizational Leadership, Policy and Development and a Masters of Arts in Public Policy and Management from the University of Minnesota. His Bachelors Degree in Speech Communications and Political Science is from Macalester College.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

DilliGirl

Be inspired and motivate others

Kevin Anderson, Dr. Organizational Design

Building High Performance Workplaces for Productivity, Fulfillment and Connection

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: